MEETING NOTES AND MINUTES

2019

October 29, 2019 Business Meeting Agenda

  1. Call to Order – Conrad Ward – Welcome and acknowledgements
  2. Invocation – Kenny Bailey
  3. Approval of the Agenda – Motion to accept agenda
  4. Opportunity for Public Comment – Members of the public/membership may comment. Limit 3 speakers, four minutes per speaker.
  5. Remarks from the President- Conrad Ward
  6. Secretary’s Report – Kurt Berringer
  7. Treasurer’s Report – John Horvath
  8. Vice Presidents Report – David Cox
  9. Events Report – Petra Cox
  10. Agriculture Extension Update – Kenny Bailey
  11. Reserved for Apiary Inspectors report/comments when attending – Nancy Rupert
  12. NCSBA Regional Director Update – Kenny Jones
  13. Unfinished Business
  14. New Business
  15. Motion to Adjourn – Conrad Ward

September 24, 2019 Business Meeting Agenda

  1. Call to Order – Conrad Ward – Welcome and acknowledgements
  2. Invocation – Kenny Bailey
  3. Approval of the Agenda – Motion to accept agenda
  4. Opportunity for Public Comment – Members of the public/membership may comment. Limit 3 speakers, four minutes per speaker.
  5. Remarks from the President- Conrad Ward
  6. Secretary’s Report – Kirk Beringer
  7. Treasurer’s Report – John Horvath
  8. Vice Presidents Report – David Cox
  9. Events Report – None at this time
  10. Agriculture Extension Update – Kenny Bailey
  11. Reserved for Apiary Inspectors report/comments when attending – Nancy Rupert
  12. NCSBA Regional Director Update – Kenny Jones
  13. Unfinished Business – None
  14. New Business – 2020 Election (Officer nominations will be announced on October 29, 2019)
  15. Motion to Adjourn – Conrad Ward

Minutes of September 24, 2019 Meeting

Pre-business meeting began at 7:00. President Conrad Ward started the meeting welcoming present and prospective new members.

Beekeeping Education: Our guest speaker was Mr. Phill Haines from Appin Bees with the subject: Preparing Hives for Winter. Phill started off asking, “Who has their hives prepared for winter?” According to Phill, you should have started the second week in August preparing hives for winter if you want strong hives in the spring. Never too late to start! He also covered other topics: the importance of feeding sugar water and pollen patties, pros and cons of the different types of feeders, protecting your bees from varroa mites and hive beetles and how to recognize a healthy hive.

Upcoming Events:

Treasurer Report: Opening Balance as of August 27, 2019 $42564.74 Deposit: $100.00 Expenditures: $343.13 Mighty Mite Balance as of September 24, 2019 $4011.61

Note: Net increase of $243.13 $19.00 cash on hand not included in reported balance

Secretary Report:

Vice President Report:

NCSBA Comments: Kenny Jones

Agriculture Extension Update – Kenny Bailey

Nancy Ruppert’s Calendar for September and October

September

October

Petra’s Notes:

Unfinished Business:

New Business:

August 27, 2019 Business Meeting Agenda

  1. Call to Order – Conrad Ward – Welcome and acknowledgements
  2. Invocation – Kenny Bailey
  3. Approval of the Agenda – motion to accept agenda
  4. Opportunity for Public Comment – members of the public/membership may comment. Limit 3 speakers, four minutes per speaker.
  5. Remarks from the President- Conrad Ward
  6. Secretary’s Report – Kirk Beringer
  7. Treasurer’s Report – John Horvath
  8. Vice Presidents Report – David Cox
  9. Agriculture Extension Update – Kenny Bailey
  10. Events Report – Petra Cox
  11. Reserved for Apiary Inspectors report/comments when attending – Nancy Rupert
  12. NCSBA Regional Directors Update– Kenny Jones
  13. Unfinished Business – Open
  14. New Business – Open
  15. Motion to Adjourn – Conrad Ward

Minutes of August 27, 2019 Meeting

Pre-business meeting began at 7:00. President Conrad Ward started the meeting welcoming present and prospective new members.

Beekeeping Education: Our guest speaker was Mr. Steve Miller with the subject: Bee Wax Melting. His presentation included how to melt bee wax, items needed to melt wax properly, the many items bee wax can be used for and provided samples of melted wax.

Upcoming Events:

Treasurer Report: Deposit: 200.00 Expenditures: 100.00 $4254.74 Balance as of July 29, 2019

        $20.00 cash on hand not included in reported balance

Secretary Report: July meeting minutes are posted on the web.

Vice President Report:

NCSBA Comments: Kenny Jones The Eastern Apiary Society meeting in Greenville, SC July 15-19, 2019 went well. No other events planned for this year.

Agriculture Extension Update – Kenny Bailey

Nancy Ruppert’s Calendar for August and September August If not in area of significant cotton bloom, harvest remaining desired honey by mid-month to keep bees from eating it. Pest control is critical this month: hive beetle populations are peaking, varroa mites are nearing their peak populations, some factors increase risk of damage from wax moth larvae, and yellow jackets/ hornets tend to be plentiful. Careful assessment of queen performance—this month is usually last chance to replace queens until the following spring. Can still make late-season splits early in August if using mated queens. Keep water available for bees constantly. Be prepared for ”badly behaving bees”: because nectar flow is so scarce, bees may become more defensive and more likely to rob other hivesinstall robbing screens or entrance reducers (but be aware of need for ventilation), and keep hive inspections as brief as possible. Completing honey harvest + decrease in queen’s egg-laying = extra empty supers of drawn comb; store them using method that prevents damage from wax moth larvae (freezing, keeping open to light/ventila- tion, using paradichlorobenzene [PDB] crystals). September Continue measures for pest control; if hives exposed to but not sickened by American foulbrood, apply treatment to prevent full-blown disease. Varroa control should be completed by end of month!! May feed thin (1:1 or more diluted) sugar syrup for 2-3 weeks to stimulate queen laying—builds up winter population—but by last week of September, begin feeding thicker (2:1) syrup for winter stores, although thicker syrup may not be necessary if >3 supers of honey left on hive and/or heavy fall nectar flow. Petra’s Notes:

Unfinished Business: None

New Business:

July 30, 2019 Business Meeting Agenda

  1. Call to Order – Conrad Ward – Welcome and acknowledgements
  2. Invocation – Kenny Bailey
  3. Approval of the Agenda – motion to accept agenda
  4. Opportunity for Public Comment – members of the public/membership may comment. Limit 3 speakers, four minutes per speaker.
  5. Remarks from the President- Kenny Jones
  6. Secretary’s Report – Kirk Beringer
  7. Treasurer’s Report – John Horvath
  8. Vice Presidents Report – David Cox
  9. Agriculture Extension Update – Kenny Bailey
  10. Events Report – Petra Cox
  11. Reserved for Apiary Inspectors report/comments when attending – Nancy Rupert
  12. NCSBA Regional Directors Update– Kenny Jones
  13. Unfinished Business – ?
  14. New Business – ?
  15. Motion to Adjourn – Conrad Ward

Minutes of July 30, 2019 Meeting

Pre-business meeting began at 7:00. President Conrad Ward started the meeting welcoming present and prospective new members.

Beekeeping Education: Our guest speaker was Nancy Ruppert with the topic of honeybee pests and diseases. Slides were show along with lecture and followed by a question and answer session. The following literature was recommened: A Field Guide to Honey Bees and Their Maladies, www.HoneyBeeHealthCoalition.com and www.SscientificBeekeeping.com

Upcoming Events:

Treasurer Report: Deposit: None No expenditures $4154.74 Balance as of July 29, 2019

        Outstanding check for $100.00 to Black River Beekeepers

Secretary Report: June meeting minutes are posted on the web.

Vice President Report: Next months guest speaker will be Steve Miller with the topic of wax preparation.

Apiary Inspector Comments: Nancy Ruppert
None 

NCSBA Comments: Kenny Jones

Agriculture Extension Update – Kenny Bailey Plans are being made for a “hands on” bee keeping class this fall. Datexs TBD.

Nancy Ruppert’s Calendar for August & September August If not in area of significant cotton bloom, harvest remaining desired honey by mid-month to keep bees from eating it. Pest control is critical this month: hive beetle populations are peaking, varroa mites are nearing their peakpopulations, some factors increase risk of damage from wax moth larvae, and yellow jackets/ hornets tend to be plentiful. Careful assessment of queen performance—this month is usually last chance to replace queens until the following spring. Can still make late-season splits early in August if using mated queens. Keep water available for bees constantly. Be prepared for ”badly behaving bees”: because nectar flow is so scarce, bees may become more defensive and more likely to rob other hivesinstall robbing screens or entrance reducers (but be aware of need for ventilation), and keep hive inspections as brief as possible. Completing honey harvest + decrease in queen’s egg-laying = extra empty supers of drawn comb; store them using method that prevents damage from wax moth larvae (freezing, keeping open to light/ventila- tion, using paradichlorobenzene [PDB] crystals). September Continue measures for pest control; if hives exposed to but not sickened by American foulbrood, apply treatment to prevent full-blown disease. Varroa control should be completed by end of month!! May feed thin (1:1 or more diluted) sugar syrup for 2-3 weeks to stimulate queen laying—builds up winter population—but by last week of September, begin feeding thicker (2:1) syrup for winter stores, although thicker syrup may not be necessary if >3 supers of honey left on hive and/or heavy fall nectar flow. Consider Nosema assessment/treatment. Combine colonies later in the month if weak and/or have failing queens. Should have brood in bottom boxif not, may need to rearrange thing Unfinished Business: None

New Business: Possible fundraiser/bee education with Black Hive Ink and Arts. More to follow.

Meeting Adjourned

June 25, 2019 Business Meeting Agenda

  1. Call to Order – Conrad Ward – Welcome and acknowledgements
  2. Invocation – Kenny Bailey
  3. Approval of the Agenda – motion to accept agenda
  4. Opportunity for Public Comment – members of the public/membership may comment. Limit 3 speakers, four minutes per speaker.
  5. Remarks from the President- Kenny Jones
  6. Secretary’s Report – Kirk Beringer
  7. Treasurer’s Report – John Horvath
  8. Vice Presidents Report – David Cox
  9. Agriculture Extension Update – Kenny Bailey
  10. Events Report - Petra Cox
  11. Reserved for Apiary Inspectors report/comments when attending – Nancy Rupert
  12. NCSBA Regional Directors Update – Kenny Jones
  13. Unfinished Business – ?
  14. New Business – ?
  15. Motion to Adjourn – Conrad Ward

Minutes of June 25, 2019 Meeting

Pre-business meeting began at 7:00. President Conrad Ward started the meeting welcoming present and prospective new members.

Beekeeping Education: Our guest speaker was Mr. Darry Gabritsch with the subject, Hive Signals & Record Keeping. His presentation included a lecture and photos of how to determine using items such as bricks and sticks as reminders or telltale signs as to what’s going on with your hive or what the hive might need. Hive inspection sheets were also handed out for record keeping.

Upcoming Events:

Treasurer Report: Deposit: 104.00 No expenditures $4154.74 Balance as of June 25, 2019

        $20.00 cash on hand not included in reported balance

Secretary Report: May meeting minutes are posted on the web.

Vice President Report:

NCSBA Comments: Kenny Jones

Agriculture Extension Update – Kenny Bailey Plans are being made for a “hands on” bee keeping class this fall.

Nancy Ruppert’s Calendar for July & August July May harvest some (or all) of honey; may continue late-season splits; continue beetle controls; keep water available for bees (see June activities). Attend NCSBA annual Summer Meeting, if possible (usually mid-July)—great learning opportunity! Get supers on for cotton honey, if hives near cotton fields. Replace failing queens; consider replacing any queen that is two years old or older. Can begin annual varroa mite assessment, and treat if needed/practical. August If not in area of significant cotton bloom, harvest remaining desired honey by mid-month to keep bees from eating it. Pest control is critical this month: hive beetle populations are peaking, varroa mites are nearing their peakpopulations, some factors increase risk of damage from wax moth larvae, and yellow jackets/ hornets tend to be plentiful. Careful assessment of queen performance—this month is usually last chance to replace queens until the following spring. Can still make late-season splits early in August if using mated queens. Keep water available for bees constantly. Be prepared for ”badly behaving bees”: because nectar flow is so scarce, bees may become more defensive and more likely to rob other hivesinstall robbing screens or entrance reducers (but be aware of need for ventilation), and keep hive inspections as brief as possible. Completing honey harvest + decrease in queen’s egg-laying = extra empty supers of drawn comb; store them using method that prevents damage from wax moth larvae (freezing, keeping open to light/ventila- tion, using paradichlorobenzene [PDB] crystals). Unfinished Business: None

New Business: Possible fundraiser/bee education with Black Hive Ink and Arts. More to follow.

May 28, 2019 Business Meeting Agenda

  1. Call to Order – Conrad Ward – Welcome and acknowledgements
  2. Invocation – Kenny Bailey
  3. Approval of the Agenda – Motion to accept agenda
  4. Opportunity for Public Comment – Members of the public/membership may comment. Limit 3 speakers, four minutes per speaker.
  5. Remarks from the President- Conrad Ward
  6. Secretary’s Report – Kirk Beringer
  7. Treasurer’s Report – John Horvath
  8. Vice Presidents Report – David Cox
  9. Events Report – Petra Cox (Visit to First Impressions Academy)
  10. Agriculture Extension Update – Kenny Bailey
  11. Reserved for Apiary Inspectors report/comments when attending – Nancy Rupert
  12. NCSBA Regional Director Update – Kenny Jones
  13. Unfinished Business – None
  14. New Business – Open
  15. Motion to Adjourn – Conrad Ward

April 30, 2019 Business Meeting Agenda

  1. Call to Order – Conrad Ward – Welcome and acknowledgements
  2. Invocation – Kenny Bailey
  3. Approval of the Agenda – Motion to accept agenda
  4. Opportunity for Public Comment – Members of the public/membership may comment. Limit 3 speakers, four minutes per speaker.
  5. Remarks from the President- Conrad Ward
  6. Secretary’s Report – Kurt Berringer
  7. Treasurer’s Report – John Horvath
  8. Vice Presidents Report – David Cox
  9. Events Report – None
  10. Agriculture Extension Update – Kenny Bailey
  11. Reserved for Apiary Inspectors report/comments when attending – Nancy Rupert
  12. NCSBA Regional Director Update – Kenny Jones
  13. Unfinished Business – None
  14. New Business – None
  15. Motion to Adjourn – Conrad Ward

Minutes of May 28, 2019 Meeting

Pre-business meeting began at 7:00. President Conrad Ward started the meeting welcoming present and prospective new members.

We had our yearly May potluck during this meeting. We had plenty of good food and a good attendance. Thanks to all who made this a great event. Most of the meeting time was spent eating and talking bees, and more eating and talking bees, so the business meeting was short and to the point. We also saw some new faces at this meeting. Welcome aboard and hope to see you again!

Beekeeping Education:
None scheduled for this date

Upcoming Events:

Treasurer Report: Deposit: 0.00 No expenditures $4050.74 Balance as of May 28, 2019

        $57.00 cash on hand not included in reported balance

Secretary Report: None

Vice President Report:

NCSBA Comments: Kenny Jones

Agriculture Extension Update – Kenny Bailey None

Nancy Ruppert’s Calendar for June Main nectar flow starts to dwindle—fewer supers needed, unless sourwood nearby: if in area of sourwood, consider harvesting available honey before mid-June sourwood flow to ensure more “pure” sourwood crop. If honey being harvested, put “wet” supers back on hives late in day to limit robbing. Can start late-season splits during last half of June; feed splits initially, even if there is nectar available Continue measures to control small hive beetle population. Keep water for bees constantly available. Make plans for attending NCSBA Summer Meeting in mid-July. Unfinished Business: None

New Business: None

Minutes of April 30, 2019 Meeting

Pre-business meeting began at 7:00. President Conrad Ward started the meeting welcoming present and prospective new members.

Beekeeping Education:
Walk Away Split, A method to increase colony numbers: Our original guest speaker wasn’t able to attend due to an illness. Kenny Jones saved the day and put together a last minute excellent and informative presentation for walk away splits followed by a question and answer session. Thanks Kenny! For more information on walk away splits go to: WWW. Dave-Cushman.Net.

Upcoming Events:

Treasurer Report: Deposit: $125.00 No expenditures $4050.00 Balance as of Apr 30, 2019

Secretary Report: None

Vice President Report:

NCSBA Comments: Kenny Jones

Agriculture Extension Update – Kenny Bailey

Nancy Ruppert’s Calendar for May and June May: Nectar flow continues—keep adding supers; get extraction/bottling equipment ready. Consider adding an additional hive entrance (via 5/8” hole or shim) above brood area, for foragers. Swarming continues—keep up prevention/capture measures. Replace failing queens. Start planting annuals for future nectar/pollen supplementation. Install traps for small hive beetles if needed (i.e., if more than 20 adult beetles seen in hive). Place two or more bee “watering holes” in apiary, if not already present. June: Main nectar flow starts to dwindle—fewer supers needed, unless sourwood nearby: if in area of sourwood, consider harvesting available honey before mid-June sourwood flow to ensure more “pure” sourwood crop. If honey being harvested, put “wet” supers back on hives late in day to limit robbing. Can start late-season splits during last half of June; feed splits initially, even if there is nectar available Continue measures to control small hive beetle population. Keep water for bees constantly available. Make plans for attending NCSBA Summer Meeting in mid-July. Unfinished Business:

New Business:

March 26, 2019 Business Meeting Agenda

  1. Call to Order – Conrad Ward – Welcome and acknowledgements
  2. Invocation – Kenny Bailey
  3. Approval of the Agenda – Motion to accept agenda
  4. Opportunity for Public Comment – Members of the public/membership may comment. Limit 3 speakers, four minutes per speaker.
  5. Remarks from the President- Conrad Ward
  6. Secretary’s Report – Kurt Berringer
  7. Treasurer’s Report – John Horvath
  8. Vice Presidents Report – David Cox
  9. Events Report – Petra Cox – 03/20/19 Visit to WT Brown Elementary School
  10. Agriculture Extension Update – Kenny Bailey
  11. Reserved for Apiary Inspectors report/comments when attending – Nancy Rupert
  12. NCSBA Regional Director Update – Kenny Jones
  13. Unfinished Business – None
  14. New Business – Motion to donate $100 to Black River Beekeepers.
  15. Motion to Adjourn – Conrad Ward

Minutes of March 26, 2019 Meeting

Pre-business meeting began at 7:00. President Conrad Ward started the meeting welcoming present and prospective new members.

Beekeeping Education:
Bees and Plants presented by Kenny Bailey. Kenny gave a very informative presentation about the importance of and the relationship of bees and plants. Slides were shown of plants and trees along with information of when the plants and trees were producing pollen and nectar.

Upcoming Events:

Treasurer Report: $4003.74 in account No deposits $53.00 Expenditures $3925.74 Balance as of Feb 26, 2019

Secretary Report: None

Vice President Report:

NCSBA Comments: Kenny Jones

Nancy Ruppert’s Calendar for April and May

April: Nectar flow is often heaviest this month: make sure that all medications are out of hive unless required for bees’ survival, be prepared to add new supers every 7-10 days, and remove feeders from all except new or weak hives. Bees should be very busy; closely examine hives that are not, and trim weeds that may be hindering flight. Swarming usually heavy—continue prevention/capture measures. Look closely at brood pattern; replace queen if needed. Have everything ready to install nucs/packages that you’ve ordered; feed upon installation. Consider adding queen excluder to prevent brood in honey supers. May: Nectar flow continues—keep adding supers; get extraction/bottling equipment ready. Consider adding an additional hive entrance (via 5/8” hole or shim) above brood area, for foragers. Swarming continues—keep up prevention/capture measures. Replace failing queens. Start planting annuals for future nectar/pollen supplementation. Install traps for small hive beetles if needed (i.e., if more than 20 adult beetles seen in hive). Place two or more bee “watering holes” in apiary, if not already present. Unfinished Business:

New Business:

February 26, 2019 Business Meeting Agenda

  1. Call to Order – Conrad Ward – Welcome and acknowledgements
  2. Invocation – Kenny Bailey
  3. Approval of the Agenda – Motion to accept agenda
  4. Opportunity for Public Comment – Members of the public/membership may comment. Limit 3 speakers, four minutes per speaker.
  5. Remarks from the President- Conrad Ward
  6. Secretary’s Report – Kirk Beringer
  7. Treasurer’s Report – John Horvath
  8. Vice Presidents Report – David Cox
  9. Events Report – Born & Bred Recap
  10. Agriculture Extension Update – Kenny Bailey
  11. Reserved for Apiary Inspectors report/comments when attending – Nancy Rupert
  12. NCSBA Regional Director Update – Kenny Jones
  13. Unfinished Business – None
  14. New Business – Kenny Jones
  15. Motion to Adjourn – Conrad Ward

Minutes of February 26, 2019 Meeting

Pre-business meeting began at 7:00. President Conrad Ward started the meeting welcoming present and prospective new members.

Beekeeping Education:
Ken Edmonds was our guest speaker. Ken gave a very informative introduction to Bee Hive Thermal Industries and the Mighty Varroa Mite Killer, a no pesticide approach to controlling varroa mites. If you missed his presentation, you can go to www.beehivethermalindustries.com for more information.

Upcoming Events:

Treasurer Report: $4003.74 in account Secretary Report: None Vice President Report: Kenny Bailey next months speaker. Dates for Nancy Ruppert’s field day, May 4 or May 11.

Added notes:

New Business:
Kenny Jones proposed a motion to make bee keeping magazines American Bee Journal and Bee Culture available to the public in the Cumberland County Cooperative Extension library. Motion presented and accepted by all.

Nancy Ruppert’s Calendar for April: Nectar flow is often heaviest this month: make sure that all medications are out of hive unless required for bees’ survival, be prepared to add new supers every 7-10 days, and remove feeders from all except new or weak hives. Bees should be very busy; closely examine hives that are not, and trim weeds that may be hindering flight. Swarming usually heavy—continue prevention/capture measures. Look closely at brood pattern; replace queen if needed. Have everything ready to install nucs/packages that you’ve ordered; feed upon installation. Consider adding queen excluder to prevent brood in honey supers.

January 29, 2019 Business Meeting Agenda

  1. Call to Order – Conrad Ward – Welcome and acknowledgements
  2. Invocation – Kenny Bailey
  3. Approval of the Agenda – Motion to accept agenda
  4. Opportunity for Public Comment – Members of the public/membership may comment. Limit 3 speakers, four minutes per speaker.
  5. Remarks from the President- Conrad Ward
  6. Secretary’s Report – Kirk Beringer
  7. Treasurer’s Report – John Horvath
  8. Vice Presidents Report – David Cox
  9. Events Report – None at this time
  10. Agriculture Extension Update – Kenny Bailey
  11. Reserved for Apiary Inspectors report/comments when attending – Nancy Rupert
  12. NCSBA Regional Director Update – Kenny Jones
  13. Unfinished Business – None
  14. New Business – Speakers
  15. Motion to Adjourn – Conrad Ward

Minutes of January 29, 2019 Meeting

Pre-business meeting began at 7:00. President Conrad Ward started the meeting welcoming present and prospective new members. Conrad also recognized John Harris for his longevity in the association, 20 years plus. John spoke about his time in the association and what has evolved through the years. Thank you, John, for your dedication in the association.

Beekeeping Education:
Kenny Jones and John Harris were our speakers for the night. Both gave an excellent presentation on basic beekeeping equipment.

Upcoming Events:

Treasurer Report: $3848.74 in account Secretary Report: Asked members for additions or deletions to One Call Notification

New Business: Attracting new speakers Kenny Jones proposed a motion to attract speakers outside of Cumberland County by paying mileage. Motion presented below:

Motion: I move that Cumberland County Beekeepers Association allocate $259.20 to four potential speakers for 2019. $.54 per mile will be paid to four speakers traveling to and from (round-trip) Fayetteville, NC to their city/town of residence. The maximum allowable mileage allowance is set at 120 miles (round-trip) or $64.80. If a speaker is further than 120 miles (round-trip), they can still be a speaker but the maximum amount they will be paid is $64.80. Total Mileage and amount to be paid to each speaker will be determined before the night of their presentation. Bee Suppliers/Dealers or anyone with a product to sell that pertains to beekeeping will not be reimbursed for mileage. This motion if accepted will only be valid for 2019. Motion presented, second & accepted by membership on 01/29/19. Kenny Jones - Cumberland County Beekeepers Association Immediate Past President

2018

December 2018 - No Meeting

November 27, 2018 Business Meeting Agenda

  1. Call to Order – Kenny Jones – Welcome and acknowledgements
  2. Invocation – Kenny Bailey
  3. Approval of the Agenda – motion to accept agenda
  4. Opportunity for Public Comment – members of the public may comment to the Executive Committee- Limit three speakers, four minutes per speaker.
  5. Remarks from Etienne Nadea - NCSBA Born and Breed Program
  6. Remarks from the President – Kenny Jones
  7. Secretary’s Report – Connie Blacketer
  8. Treasurer’s Report – John Horvath
  9. Vice Presidents Report – Conrad Ward
  10. Agricultural Extension Update - Kenny Bailey
  11. Reserved for Apiary Inspectors Report/Comments when attending - Nancy Rupert
  12. Old Business – None
  13. New Business – Nominations for 2019 Executive Commitee
  14. Motion to Adjourn

October 30, 2018 Business Meeting Agenda

  1. Call to Order – Kenny Jones – Welcome and acknowledgements
  2. Invocation – Kenny Bailey
  3. Approval of the Agenda – motion to accept agenda
  4. Opportunity for Public Comment – members of the public/membership may comment. Limit 3 speakers, four minutes per speaker.
    • John Harris
  5. Remarks from the President- Kenny Jones
  6. Secretary’s Report – Connie Blacketer (Report will be given at the November Meeting)
  7. Treasurer’s Report – John Horvath (Report will be given at the November Meeting)
  8. Vice Presidents Report – Conrad Ward
  9. Events Report - Kenny Jones - Carvers Creek “Blast from the Past”
  10. Agriculture Extension Update – Kenny Bailey
  11. Reserved for Apiary Inspectors report/comments when attending – Nancy Rupert
  12. Unfinished Business – None
  13. New Business – Election Nominees & November Potluck
  14. Raffle
  15. Motion to Adjourn -

Minutes of Meeting October 30, 2018

Pre-business meeting began at 7:00: How are your bees? One way to check their condition is by checking the weight of the hive. A light hive could indicate inadequate honey stores for the Winter. Reduce entrances now to prevent mice from entering.
A pesticide class will be taught at the agricultural building. The class includes a public health portion, as well as mosquito spraying. Anyone would benefit from learning about this important subject, especially beekeepers and those concerned about our threatened environment.
Nancy”s Calendar Combine weak hives and hives with weak queens. Make sure there is adequate ventilation for Winter. Feed bees a 2:1 syrup during the Winter months. There are still a few food sources during Winter months. Planting food sources that will provide Winter sustinance is long-term bee provision. Install bottom boards, put in entrance reducers, catch up on chores before the holidays.
The University of Georgia video on winterizing was full of beneficial information, way too much to relate here. There are many videos on beekeeping available through the U of G, and they are a valuable resource for beekeepers.
Business meeting began at 7:50: Invocation by Kenny Bailey. Agenda approved. The University of Mt. Olive has grants and loans available. Treasurer’s report balance $4152.20. November 27th potluck, with meat and drinks provided.
Current situation regarding CCBA officers: Conrad Ward nominated for president. John Horvath will remain treasurer. The vice-president and secretary positions need to be filled for 2019. There is one board seat to be filled as well. The meeting was adjourned at 8:43 after the raffle.

September 25, 2018 Business Meeting Agenda

  1. Call to Order – Kenny Jones – Welcome and acknowledgements
  2. Invocation – Kenny Bailey
  3. Approval of the Agenda – motion to accept agenda
  4. Opportunity for Public Comment – members of the public/membership may comment. Limit 3 speakers, four minutes per speaker.
  5. Remarks from the President- Kenny Jones
  6. Secretary’s Report – Connie Blacketer
  7. Treasurer’s Report – John Horvath
  8. Vice Presidents Report – Conrad Ward
  9. Agriculture Extension Update – Kenny Bailey
  10. Reserved for Apiary Inspectors report/comments when attending – Nancy Rupert
  11. Unfinished Business – None
  12. New Business – Carvers Creek “Blast from The Past” & Cape Fear Botanical Garden “Heritage Festival Events - October 6, 2018.
  13. Raffle
  14. Motion to Adjourn

Minutes of Meeting September 25, 2018

Pre-business meeting started at 7:02: President Kenny Jones introduced association officers and board members. Kenny’s sugar shake had the result of 7 mites for the 300 bee sample. Treatment of mites and other pests should be done preventively, so that pests don’t spread to other hives. Small hive beetles also need to be controlled, and an effective, inexpensive technique is the mite cloth. To prevent varroa mites, the most destructive pest, perform the sugar shake test 4 times a year. Most shakes should be done between July and October.
Business meeting started at 7:40: The agenda had been posted on-line and was approved. Cumberland County Fair information was shared with the members, including the 1st place and Best In Show ribbons won by CCBA. Thanks to everyone who volunteered, work done by Kenny, Rebekah, Scott, Petra and others who contributed to the ongoing success of our organization.
Elections are in December, and the vice-president and secretary positions need to be filled for 2019.
Kenny Bailey will have the hands-on beekeeping class in the Spring. The date will be announced.
Born and Bred will be 2/16/19. The meeting was adjourned at 8:04 following the raffle drawing.

August 28, 2018 Business Meeting Agenda

  1. Call to Order – Kenny Jones – Welcome and acknowledgements
  2. Invocation – Kenny Bailey
  3. Approval of the Agenda – motion to accept agenda
  4. Opportunity for Public Comment – members of the public/membership may comment. Limit 3 speakers, four minutes per speaker.
  5. Remarks from the President- Kenny Jones
  6. Secretary’s Report – Connie Blacketer
  7. Treasurer’s Report – John Horvath
  8. Vice Presidents Report – Conrad Ward
  9. Reserved for Apiary Inspectors report/comments when attending – Nancy Rupert
  10. Unfinished Business –
  11. New Business –
  12. Motion to Adjourn -

Next meeting will be September 25, 2018 (Our guest speaker will be Cumberland County Beekeepers Association board member John Harris)

Minutes of Meeting August 28, 2018

Pre-business meeting: President Kenny Jones introduced the officers and board members present. After last months presentation, some club members made mead. Grapes and Hops in the Millstone Shopping Center in Hope Mills has beer, wine, and mead making supplies for those looking.

Seasonal Hive Management: Preparing for Fall/Winter Contents and presentation by Nancy Ruppert The August presentation began with questions- Are you a procrastinator? Are you too busy? Are you too limited on time for learning about your bees?
These questions were important for significant reasons–Bees are on their own calender. Bees are fragile, especially in today’s world. Winter is bees’ most challenging time.

1 topic–Pests

Pests can, and often do, kill. Even strong colonies can be overcome by pests. Pests are generally worst in the summer, but the effects can last into later seasons. Summer bees are hot, hungry, and often have debilitating infestations of pests. Some of the pests that infiltrate hives are yellow jackets, wax moths, and hive beetles. Wax moths generally do major damage to weak hives, making a mess and leading to major losses of bees. Hive beetles can ruin a “good” hive in 10 days. These beetles really love a hive in the shade. Verrora mites affect bees in all phases- they attack adult bees, they attach themselves to bees even before they hatch. They suck hemalymph from bees, the equivalent of bee ‘blood’. The VM also drains fat from the bee, a serious problem going into the winter. In addition to the damage that VM’s commit, they are carriers of many vituses.
Discerning whether there is a failing queen or pests may take some effort by the beekeeper. Poor brood pattern- queen or hive beetles eating eggs? Sunken caps on brood- American Foul Brood or undernourished brood due to pests? Shortage of adult bees- undiagnosed situation with multiple possibilities or undernourished queen due to pollen (protein) shortage? Weak bees are the ones that freeze, that are too weak to go to their food- VMs kill more bees than all the other causes- bee enemy #1! Learn all that is available about VMs, and take steps to control them to ensure a healthy colony. One excellent site is www.honeybeehealthcoalition.org, which has information on checking for pests, treatments, and more.
Integrated pest management: Take action in a timely manner. TEST- don’t just treat. There are many ways to approach the pest problem, but constant evaluation, treatment when needed, and prevention are all consistent ways to lessen, contain, and control many of the pests that attack the bee population. Finally, remember that the nectar season is short, and the honey has to last most of the year.
Business meeting: Called to order at 8:10. Invocation. Agenda approved. Information regarding queens available from CA submitted by Jim Fleming. Elections in Nov. President Kenny Jones stepping down; Conrad Ward is nominated for the office of president. Nominations will be accepted through October for CCBA offices.
Minutes posted online and accepted by vote.
Treasurer’s report: $3272.21 balance, accepted by motion and vote. Purchases for CCFair discussed.
NC State Fair in October.
AFB in a distant NC county. CFBG hive will have a plaque for Jim Griffith, and John Horvath will be the caretaker.
Raffle, then meeting adjourned at 8:42.

July 30, 2018 Business Meeting Agenda

  1. Call to Order – Kenny Jones – Welcome and acknowledgements
  2. Invocation – Kenny Bailey (Nancy Rupert gave the invocation in Kenny Baileys absence)
  3. Approval of the Agenda – motion to accept agenda
  4. Opportunity for Public Comment – members of the public/membership may comment. Limit 3 speakers, four minutes per speaker.
  5. Remarks from the President- Kenny Jones
  6. Secretary’s Report – Connie Blacketer
  7. Treasurer’s Report – John Horvath
  8. Vice Presidents Report – Conrad Ward
  9. Unfinished Business – CCBA Hive Update
  10. New Business – ” Blast From the Past” Event at Carvers Creek & 2018 Cumberland County Fair
  11. Motion to Adjourn

Next Meeting will be Tuesday August 28, 2018 (Our guest speaker will be NCDA & CS South Eastern NC Apiary Inspector Nancy Rupert)

MINUTES OF MEETING July 31, 2018

Cumberland County Beekeepers Association

Pre-business meeting began at 7:05: Kenny introduced association officers, board, and Nancy Ruppert, NC Apiary Inspector, to 1st time attendees and guests. It was announced that President Kenny Jones has been certified a Master beekeeper. Congratulations, Kenny!
Guest speakers: Ben and Becky Starr of Starrlight Mead Ben and Becky Starr, of Starrlight Mead of Pittsboro, NC, were delightful and generous guests, sharing their delicious mead with CCBA. Ben, a beekeeper from childhood, related their journey from Renaissance Fair novices to proprietors of Starrlight Mead. Ben also described terms, equipment, processes, mead history and origin, chemical composition, and recipe ingredients, giving the club an outstanding overview of a fascinating enterprise. Additionally, the club was given valuable info about making mead for personal use or profit.
Next was tasting the mead, not once, not twice, but 5 different samples! These included Lavender, Semi-sweet, Apple Spice (the original winning entry at the Renaissance Fair), and Joe’s Orange. A huge thank you to both Ben and Becky, informative and charming guests. It is easy to imagine the hospitality that Starrlight Mead offers to its patrons! We sincerely appreciate the excellent presentation.

Topics of dicussion during the pre-business meeting included hives lost to wax moths, the current nectar source, soy beans, and chores for August: honey harvest by mid-month, queen assessment, and keeping water continually available for hives. Additionally, some hives have been defensive, leading to short inspections when needed. Suggestions for storing comb: Freeze, use Paramoth, or expose to air and light. Comb must be aired 48 hours before using if treated with Paramoth.
NCSBA conference topic: Bee sting therapy by Dr. Seely Joint NC and SC Beekeepers’ meeting March 1st and 2nd, 2019, in Monroe.
NCSBA Fall meeting is in Hickory. Business meeting: Opened at 8:32. Agenda, minutes, and treasurer’s report approved. Nancy Ruppert will be August’s guest speaker. John Harris will be September’s speaker. Vice-president Ward will be October’s speaker, on wax use.
Nancy Ruppert’s current concerns for beekeepers: robbing, lack of honey storage leading to July/August starvation, verroa mite infestations, beetle treatment (microfiber towels from Mann Lake). CFBG hive is being refinished. New business: Carver’s Creek “Blast from the Past” is October 6th. Volunteers are being sought for this event.
Cumberland County Fair is August 31st-September 9th. Register to volunteer on SignUp Genius. Certified beekeepers can get community service points for volunteering for this and other events. Expenses for the club’s booth, including honey, honey sticks, and other costs were discussed. Next year’s Born and Bred (queen-rearing) event will be hosted by CCBA. The course will be all class room, with a new book, to equip local beekeepers to raise quality queens from local areas (micro-climates). This event will take place the 1st week of March, 2019. A sincere and much deserved thank you to Petra Cox for helping our organization in so many ways. Petra does an amazing job wherever she is needed, and we appreciate the time and service she gives so generously.
Meeting adjourned at 9:11, after the raffle drawings.

June 26, 2018 Business Meeting Agenda

  1. Call to Order – Kenny Jones – Welcome and acknowledgements
  2. Invocation – Kenny Bailey
  3. Approval of the Agenda – motion to accept agenda
  4. Opportunity for Public Comment – members of the public/membership may comment. Limit 3 speakers, four minutes per speaker.
  5. Remarks from the President- Kenny Jones
  6. Secretary’s Report – Connie Blacketer
  7. Treasurer’s Report – John Horvath
  8. Vice Presidents Report – Conrad Ward
  9. Educational Outreach - Petra Cox - Programs with the Boy Scouts and at Clark Park.
  10. Unfinished Business – Jim Griffith Memorial Update – Kenny Jones
    • Kurt Berringer is finishing the english garden hive to resemble other CFBG heritage garden structures.
  11. New Business –None
  12. Motion to Adjourn

Next Meeting will be Tuesday July 31, 2018 (Our Guest Speaker will be Starlite Mead)

MINUTES OF MEETING June 26, 2018

Cumberland County Beekeepers Association Pre-business meeting began at7:15: The officers for 2018 were introduced by President Kenny Jones to first-time guests. Vice-president Conrad Ward introduced guest speaker Jim Rosensteel,founder of Brick City Bees. Jim is a beekeeper from Lee County, specifically Sanford, NC, who created Brick City Bee Initiative, which champions bees through an innovative method known as urban beekeeping. Jim talked about issues common to many beekeepers-loss through procrastination, mites, winter feeding, hive location, and bee starvation. Jim also touched on situations that the average beekeeper might NOT encounter as well, such as killing a queen by dropping her on a hot roof! Taking beekeeping urban has the advantages of raised public awareness, healthier bee populations, less pesticide, diverse food sources, and lots of water. Although all of these positive qualities make sense, it is not how most people would initially view city versus rural beekeping. Additional advantages include student and other community involvement, hive sponsorship, raised awareness, and beekeeping combined with public service pursuits such as Hives Helping Heroes. Mr. Rosensteel has a website, and can also be followed on Facebook and Twitter. He was presented a CCBA lifetime membership by VP Conrad, and will continue to pioneer opportunities for beekeeping education, community service, and public participation. Many thanks for being such an outstanding bee advocate! After President Jones opened the floor for questions, some of the topics covered included bee feeding, splits, taking honey, queens, and using nuke boxes to save hives. The natural cycle of hive reduction for winter was also discussed.
Our adorable junior member, Kinsley Jones, made a bee hotel. She seems to be following in her parents’ footsteps.
Calender Suggested late summer actions, per bee inspector Nancy Ruppert’s schedule, include replacing low quality queens, assessing and treating mite infestations, and keeping fresh water available for hive needs. NCSBA meeting is in mid-July with guest presenter Tom Seely.
July 19th-21st Class in queen raising. Blueberries, because many are heavily sprayed with insecticide, are not considered a good bee crop.
Kenny Jones’ ongoing bear situation was discussed, as the bear population will continue to explore human habitats and need to be understood to avoid negative interactions.
Business Meeting: The business meeting began at 8:32.
Invocation by Kenny Bailey.
Minutes approved. Treasury report approved. Items of interest: The CCBA field trip was a success. The queen in the CFBG is failing and will be replaced. The non-pesticide heat treatment for varroa mites is successful, consisting of raising a hive’s temperature to 106 degrees for 160 minutes.
Hosting the NCSBA Born and Bred Program in March 2019 was decided by majority vote. A space for 200 will be rented to host the event.
VP Ward again thanked our speaker, Jim Rosensteel, for his presentation on urban beekeeping. Beekeeping needs fresh concepts, and this presentation had more than could be covered here. Looking at situations with innovative ideas is needed for beekeeping and other endeavors as well, and Jim shows the potential for success by doing so. The July 31st meeting will be on meade making. Dan Ivy, due to illness, is selling beekeeping equipment.
Jack Britt High School is interested in installing a beehive. The meeting adjourned around 9 p.m.

May 29, 2018 Business Meeting Agenda

  1. Call to Order – Kenny Jones – Welcome and acknowledgements
  2. Invocation – Kenny Bailey
  3. Approval of the Agenda – motion to accept agenda
  4. Opportunity for Public Comment – members of the public/membership may comment. Limit 3 speakers, four minutes per speaker.
  5. Remarks from the President- Kenny Jones
  6. Secretary’s Report – Connie Blacketer
  7. Treasurer’s Report – John Horvath
  8. Vice Presidents Report – Conrad Ward
  9. Unfinished Business – Jim Griffith Memorial Update (We have the equipment, approval and maintainer)– Kenny Jones
  10. New Business –None
  11. Motion to Adjourn

Next Meeting will be Tuesday June 26, 2018 (Guest Speaker - Jim Rosensteel from Brick City Bees)

May 29, 2018 Business Meeting

Tonight’s meeting was the summer potluck dinner, and the members and guests had an amazing array of barbeque and home-cooked specialties to enjoy. It was a delicious meal, and many thanks to all who took part. Pre-business meetimg: 8:02 Nancy’s prediction–Soon we’ll be getting ready for winter! Mid-July is the latest opportunity for splits. April/May/June were the the time for up to four splits and is drawing to a close.
Upcoming Events NCSB is in Flat Rock July 19th-21st. CCBA Field Day is Saturday, June 2nd, at 9:30 starting at CFBG.
The hive to honor Jim Griffith at CFBG has been generously donated. The hive will be maintained by John Horvath, and will have a commemoration plaque in the near future.
Business meeting: 8:25 Invocation No new business was introduced and the meeting was adjourned at 8:38.

April 24, 2018 Business Meeting Agenda

  1. Call to Order – Kenny Jones – Welcome and acknowledgements
  2. Invocation – Kenny Bailey
  3. Approval of the Agenda – motion to accept agenda
  4. Opportunity for Public Comment – members of the public/membership may comment. Limit 3 speakers, four minutes per speaker.
  5. Remarks from the President- Kenny Jones
  6. Secretary’s Report – Connie Blacketer
  7. Treasurer’s Report – John Horvath
  8. Unfinished Business – Jim Griffith Memorial Update – Kenny Jones
  9. New Business –None
  10. Motion to Adjourn

Next Meeting will be Tuesday May 29, 2018

April 24, 2018 MINUTES OF MEETING

Cumberland County Beekeepers Association

Prebusiness meeting: The presentation for April was given by Kenny Bailey on pollinators and pollination. The information, especially on what individuals can do to protect pollinators, was very relevent.
May Calendar Nectar flow is continuing. Adding supers, giving bees extra hive entrances, and replacing weak queens are still necessary.
Planting native annuals are a good addition to your bee yard. The bee yard should have at least 2 water sources.
Business meeting: Meeting called to order at 8:15. Invocation Agenda approved. Member discussion: volunteering and the potluck dinner in May. Arbor Day.org is a source for free trees. The association has an updated web page and lots of info and resources.
The treasurers report was accepted by motion.
The purchase of Jim Griffith’s memorial hive, to be placed at the CFBG, was approved by association vote. The hive will be maintained by J. Horvath. After the raffle, the meeting adjourned at 9:02.

March 27, 2018 Business Meeting Agenda

  1. Call to Order – Kenny Jones – Welcome and acknowledgements
  2. Invocation – Kenny Bailey
  3. Approval of the Agenda – motion to accept agenda
  4. Opportunity for Public Comment – members of the public/membership may comment. Limit 3 speakers, four minutes per speaker.
  5. Remarks from the President- Kenny Jones
  6. Secretary’s Report – Connie Blacketer
  7. Treasurer’s Report – John Horvath
  8. Vice Presidents Report – Conrad Ward
  9. Unfinished Business – Jim Griffith Memorial Update – Kenny Jones
  10. New Business –?
  11. Motion to Adjourn Next Meeting will be Tuesday April 24, 2018

March 27, 2018 MINUTES OF MEETING

Cumberland County Beekeepers Association

Prebusiness meeting: President Kenny Jones introduced association officers.
The presentation for March was the Hive Scale Project, given by Annie Krueger. This project is through the Bayer Corporation. Contact information is: annie.krueger.ext@bayer.com. Ms. Krueger was awarded a lifetime membership to CCBA for her excellent presentation. April Calender April has heavy nectar flow. New supers should be added every 7-10 days. Feeders should be removed except for new or weak hives. Trim weeds around hives so that flight paths are unobstructed. Swarming is possible, so conditions within the hive should be monitored. Observe brood pattern, and replace underperforming queens.
Business meeting: Invocation The meeting agenda was approved by motion. The minutes were approved by motion. The treasurer”s report was approved by motion.
Rebekah Jones was congratulated for her article which appeared in Women”s View.
There will be a cook out at the May meeting.
New people attending were welcomed.
There is a conference July 19th in Flat Rock. The meeting adjourned after the raffle at 8:46.

February 27,2018 Business Meeting Agenda

  1. Call to Order- Kenny Jones - Welcome and acknowledgements
  2. Invocation - Kenny Bailey
  3. Approval of the Agenda - motion to accept agenda
  4. Opportunity for Public Comment - members of the public/membership may comment. Limit 3 speakers, four minutes per speaker.
  5. Remarks from the President - Kenny Jones - Website Update
  6. Secretary’s Report - Connie Blacketer
  7. Treasurer’s Report - John Horvath
  8. Vice Presidents Report - Conrad Ward
  9. Unfinished Business - Based on our January 208 general membership meeting, we do not have any unfinished business.
  10. New Business - Dontions in remembrance of Jim Griffith
  11. Adjourn

January 30, 2018 Business Meeting Agenda

  1. Call to Order – Kenny Jones – Welcome and acknowledgements
  2. Invocation – Kenny Bailey
  3. Approval of the Agenda – motion to accept agenda
  4. Opportunity for Public Comment – members of the public/membership may comment. Limit 3 speakers, four minutes per speaker.
  5. Remarks from the President- Kenny Jones (Board Meeting Highlights)
  6. Secretary’s Report – Connie Blacketer
  7. Treasurer’s Report – John Horvath
  8. Vice Presidents Report – Conrad Ward
  9. Unfinished Business – Based on our November 2017 general membership meeting & January 16, 2018 meeting, we do not have any unfinished business.
  10. New Business – Appointment of Website/Software Committee Chair – Kenny Jones John Harris Jr./Webmaster

  11. Motion to Adjourn

    January 30, 2018 MINUTES OF MEETING

Pre-business meeting began at 7:05 with refreshments provided by Scott Gibson and Conrad Ward. What an outstanding start to 2018! Thank you both-everything was delicious. Sincere appreciation to Tammy Shaw for helping with pre-meeting preparations, as well as handling the door, raffle tickets, and so much more!

CCBA has seven NCSBA Certified Beekeepers! Congratulations to all of you, and to Kenny Jones and Kenny Bailey, who provided instruction and testing. In addition, Kenny Jones holds the Journeyman Beekeeper Certification, and Kenny Bailey is a Certified Master Beekeeper. 62% of Cumberland County’s members are NCSBA members.

There were 49 days til Spring on January 30th, and the Red Maple trees were already coloring. Kenny Jones found headless bees in his apiary. A theory for this occurance is Zombie flies, but there is no definitive explanation for this disturbing incident.

Nancy Ruppert’s Notes for February

There have been too many bee deaths reported. The extreme cold for our region took only a marginal number. The most likely cause of bee deaths is lack of preparation for the winter months. If you were behind on hive care and maintenance before winter, you could have caused harm to your bees now. Queens may not lay even winter egg levels if there is a Varroa infestation or Nosema present in the hive. On the plus side, there is very low probability of American Foul Brood.

February Calendar

Combine hives if necessary Repair or replace damaged equipment Move hives to a better location if necessary Replace old comb and reduce excessive drone cells Fondant is safer than syrup for winter feedings* Keep learning!

Upcoming Events

March 1 st-3rd State Beekeepers meeting in New Bern. Speakers of note are Marla Spivak and Daniel Schmehl. July 19th-21st NCSBA in Flat Rock, NC

Business Meeting

Called to order at 8:14, followed by the invocation and approval of the January 16th Executive Committee Meeting Agenda. There were no comments from the membership during the allocated period. John Harris Jr is CCBA’s new webmaster. Welcome! The minutes of the November 28th, 2017 association meeting (consisting of 2018’s Executive Committee and Board of Directors) were accepted. The treasury report, with a balance of $2941.42, was accepted.

Adjourned 8:45

January 16, 2018 Executive Commitee Meeting Agenda

  1. Call to Order – Kenny Jones – Welcome and acknowledgements
  2. Invocation – Kenny Bailey
  3. Approval of the Agenda – motion to accept agenda
  4. Opportunity for Public Comment – members of the public may comment to the Executive Committee- Limit three speakers, four minutes per speaker.
  5. Remarks from the President – Short discussion
  6. Appointment of Nominating Committee Chair- Kenny Jones

                                                Scott Gibson
  7. Appointment of Webmaster – Kenny Jones

                                                CeSea Lawson
  8. Secretary’s Report – Connie Blacketer – motion for approval
  9. Treasurer’s Report – John Horvath
  10. Vice Presidents Report – Conrad Ward- 2018 Speakers
  11. Old Business – None ?
  12. New Business – Appointment of Parliamentarian/Kenny Bailey, Refreshments for Monthly Meetings, Membership Mentoring, The need for School Program Speakers, Cape Fear Wildlife Expo (March 16-18), Carvers Creek Science Festival (April 14, 2018), Summer Picnic ?, Cumberland County Fair (August 31 – September 9, 2018 ?), Carvers Creek (October 6, 2018), Treasurers Audit Reports/ January and July 2018, Storage Needs.
  13. Motion to Adjourn

2017

December 2017 - No Meeting

November 28th, 2017 - (Annual Potluck)

New business:

The acclamation of executive officers for 2018 was submitted by motion and passed by majority vote of the association. The Executive Committee for 2018 is as follows:

President: Kenny Jones

Vice-president: Conrad Ward Secretary: Connie Blacketer Treasurer: John Horvath

The Board of Directors for 2018 was submitted by motion and passed by majority vote of the association. The Board of Directors for 2018 is as follows:

John Harris,serving the 1st year of a 3 year term. Paul Johnson,serving the 2nd year of a 3 year term. Jim Fleming,serving the 3rd year of a 3 year term.

August 29, 2017 - Meeting Minutes

Pre-business meeting began at 7:07:

Honeybee Health Coalition.org videos were shown by President Jones.

September Tasks-Nancy Ruppert Evaluate pests in your hives. Employ preventive measures for American Foul Brood.

Complete varroa mite treatment and retest for effectiveness by the end of the month. V mites can cause deformed wings, weakness, and spread viruses through the hive, among other conditions.

Begin feeding 2:1 syrup by mid-month.

Perform a Nosema assessment of your hives. Symptoms of Nosema include weak bees, including the inability to fly; bees that won’t eat; diarrhea.

Combine weak hives. Keep brood box on the bottom, as this is the natural position for bee brood.

Integrated Pest Management should utilize multiple methods, rotating those found to be most effective. Essential oils, formic acid, Varroa-resistant queens-beekeepers should utilize what works best for them! Remember one thing that is consistantly true–Timing Is Everything!

Planning for Spring–Spring is the optimal time to perform hive splits and requeen, though most hives will requeen themselves every year or so. Monitor brood pattern, bee population, etc., to see if intervention is needed. Summer solstice is the approximate peak hive population date; therefore, it is an excellent target date for decisions regarding queen effectiveness and replacement. Spring is the time for the 6 week honey flow, so plan your spring equipment needs, order queens early if you need them, and use those long, mostly idle winter months to carefully plan for your hives’ health and well-being.

Excellent question during discussion–“Are we encouraging, promoting, and creating chemically­ dependent bees by our own dependence and reliance on chemical treatments?” This is a vitally important question on multiple levels, and one that all beekeepers should consider carefully. How beekeepers approach “intervention”, particularly with chemicals and other human­ introduced controls, will affect much more than just the beekeeping world. The decisions beekeepers make will affect THE WORLD ITSELF in ways from small to great. We have a huge responsibility.

Business Meeting Business portion of the meeting was called to order at 8:34. Invocation by Kenny Bailey. Treasury reported a balance of $1972.03, and the report was accepted by hand vote. There was no secretary’s report submitted.

1st day of CC Fair is 9/1/17, and entrance is free. Take advantage of this, and see the amazing CCBA boorh and others exhibits as well.

9/9 Columbus County Beekeepers Honey Festival

10/14 Carver’s Creek State Park event from 10-3.

10/9 Spring Lake Farmer’s Market.

10/30 Fund raiser

It was recommended that members view the magazines purchased for the Headquarters Library on your next visit there. Education of the public is of paramount importance to beekeeping on EVERY LEVEL. The CCBA secretary had such an opportunity at a meeting/clinic of the Fayetteville Rose Association this Spring, and was able to correct the erroneous viewpoint presented regarding neonicotinoids, that they were “safe, effective, and harmless”. The education that our members receive is an asset we pass on to the community and ultimately the world.

Raffle items were donated by Green Side Up and Bubba’s, as well as items from the association. Congrats to all the winners.

Meeting was adjourned at approximately 9p.m.

July 25th, 2017 - Meeting Minutes

Pre-business meeting:

The purchase of honey and jars for the October meade-making meeting was discussed and will proceed.

Business meeting: Invocation Jim Fleming presented a motion to accept the June secretary and treasury reports, John Harris seconded, and the motion passed by hand vote.

Authorization to purchase 5 gallons of honey and small honey bear containers and jars for the CC Fair passed by vote.

The club passed a motion for the purchase of a honey bee mascot costume ( $300 maximum cost).

The floor was open for suggestions regarding the CCBA booth at the CC Fair. More ideas to engage children was one idea that everyone agreed was important. Members were encouraged to volunteer for this event! Flyers about beekeeping classes were one item that will be printed, as many new beekeepers are reached at the fair.

Club honey tasting-“How Does Yours Compare??”-was suggested.

Carver”s Creek State Park event is October 14th. Volunteer on Sign Up Genius!!! Nancy Ruppert gives an awesome hive demonstration, and kept a crowd through the entire time last year! Everyone had fun, learned some new things (not just about bees!), had a nice lunch, and had the opportunity to fellowship with members and the public. Don’t miss this event!!!

June 27th, 2017 - Meeting Minutes

Pre-business meeting began at 7:05: Tepics and dates: NCSBA July 13-15 SCBA July 19-21, in Florence, SC Cumberland County Fair September 1-10

NC State Fair October 12-22

July Tasks-Nancy Ruppert

Harvest honey

Perform splits

Continue beetle controls

Provide plentiful water

Replace failing queens, or queens over 2 years old

Consider replacing queens with varroa-sensitive queens, which open pupae to remove mites

Do varroa mite assessment and treat if needed.

Take pests seriously! President Jones showed varroa mite videos. This pest has only been present in the SE US since the 1990’s,but has led to the weakening and demise of many bee colonies. There are a variety of measures which can be employed against these pests.

With the honey flow over1 monitor hives for sugar syrup feeding.

There are diverse ways to attempt swarm prevention. Destroying queen cells will not automatically prevent swarming, but is one suggestion. Another is moving the queen through a split (10 feet from original hive).

When transporting a hive. be aware of heat, vibration, and sun.

When examining hive, don’t turn frames on sides, as the queen can be injured or killed.

Open hives weekly during honey flow or when establishing a new hive, but every 4 to 6 weeks otherwise, unless monitoring or treating a threat. Opening a hive sets it back 2 days. During winter, closely watch food stores. Feed as needed, as starvation is a common cause of hive demise, Want to know approximate bee numbers or honey stores? Experience helps, but judging weight is an indicator of bee numbers and honey amounts.

Business Meeting Meeting was called to order at 8:06: Invocation

Secretary’s report and treasurer’s report accepted by vote. A motion to purchase 5 gallons of honey to use in making meade ( for October ) was passed by vote, as well as reviewing the club website bill and the purchase of a $100 gift certificate to the Mclaurins for assistance to the association.

Meeting Adjourned 8:22

May 30, 2017 Meeting Minutes

Pre-business meeting began at 7:05:

Members discussed conditions and concerns of their hives. Nancy Ruppert’s recommendations: Check for Varroa mites. Peak months for Varroa mites are August and September. Watch for robbing of hives. Watch for Small Hive Beetle and Wax Moth presence, and contain infestations when they occur.

Don’t use Honey Bee Healthy at this time of year, as it encourages robbing.

Feed only if there is a reason-a split,a late nuc, or some other significant concern. There was a honey extracting demonstration by Kenny Jones. Business meeting began at 7:45:

The business meeting was opened with prayer. To be approved at next meeting. The treasurer’s report was reviewed and accepted by vote.

A $100 gift certificate in appreciation for donations was approved by club vote and will be sent by President Jones.

Volunteers for Cub Scout demonstrations June 26th-30th were sought. Let Kenny Jones know if you are interested or sign up on Sign Up Genius. Plans for the CCBA field trip with Apiary Inspector Nancy Ruppert were discussed and finalized. The 100 year observance of the North Carolina State Beekeepers Association is July 13th in Winston-Salem.

The raffle winners for May were Kathleen Hare,Kirk Beringer,and Alba Young. The meeting was adjourned at 8:18.

April 25th, 2017 Meeting Minutes

The pre-business meeting opened at 7:05:

There were multiple events that were already attended by the CCBA in April: Agriculture Field Day was April 11th at the NC Co-op Extension office. South River Electric Membership Corporation held the Annual Meeting of Members April 20th at the Crown Arena, where CCBA had a booth. Bob Wholey, Paul Johnson, and KirBleringer volunteered for the event.

Upcoming events for the rest of April:

There are to be two presentations at Kimberly Hampton Primary School on April 27th. The presentaions are to the 4th and 5th grades.

There will be a presentation to the Corvias Group on Ft. Bragg by Tammy Shaw and Bob Wholey on April 28th.

The Cape Fear Botanical Garden will host a May Day event with traditional festivities, including a May Pole,on April 30th. There will be a lot to enjoy at the event,including a presentation by CCBA.

May events:

May 6th Born and Bred in Greenville,NC May 9th TC Berrian School May 12th The Cameron Group

May 19th The Agriculture Business Tour

May 20th Sandhills Family Heritage Association

June 3rd is the CCBA Field Day with Nancy Ruppert. It will begin at the CFBG. Members are encouraged to have their hives used for demonstration.

NCSBA will host the Summer meeting in Winston-Salem July 7th thru the 13th. This is the centennial celebration for the association.

May Calendar

Keep adding supers as needed to your hives. Consider an additional hive entrance - a 5/8” hole or a shim to leave space above the brood area.

Have extraction and bottling equipment ready. Make splits at the end of the honey flow (the end of May). Watch your hives for swarming behavior. Use prevention and capture techniques if swarms occur. Replace poorly performing queens. For re-queening strategies see notes from earlier meetings. Nuc boxes will house a weak colony,and greatly increase the odds of their survival. Plant annuals for the future benefit of your bees. Small Hive Beetle controls: the Freeman bottom board, beetle jails. Each hive needs up to a gallon of water a day. Have 2 or more water sources. The hive is cooled by water foragers and fanning,so water is extremely important. There are 16 May blooms- Blackberries,Sumac (4/3- 9/1), Huckleberries,Crimson Clover (4/10- 5/5), White Clover, Tulip Poplar, Tupelo Gum,Raspberries, Holly,Black Gum, Black Locust, Vetch,Gallberry, Privet, Persimmon,and Sweet Clover.

June- Sourwood

The business meeting opened at 8:01: The invocation opened the meeting. The secretary and treasurer’s reports were accepted by motion and vote. There was no unfinished business. The new business was discussion of equipment available from Edith Griffith. The club is purchasing an extractor, which was recommended as a good investment by Jim Fleming. Mr. Fleming introduced a motion for the club to purchase equipment, and Paul Johnson seconded the motion, which passed by a show of hands. There is an inventory available on the club website.

The question of storage space for club equipment is ongoing.

Jim Fleming made a motion to fumigate used equipment that the club purchased,which was seconded by Bob Wholey and passed by show of hands.

Raffle results:1st prize of nuc- John Horvath- 2nd prize of scratcher redonated

Meeting adjourned at 8:20.

February 28th, 2017 Meeting Minutes

The pre-business meeting began at 7:10. Upcoming dates: NCSBA meeting March 3rd and 4th in SC.

The Fayetteville Camellia Show March 4th and 5th at the Bordeaux Convention Center.

3/12 Daylight -savings time-Spring forward one hour.

The Cape Fear Wildlife Expo March 17-19. Volunteers needed.

3/20 First day of Spring.

April 8th-Grand opening of Midnight Bee Supply Company,120 E. Maple Street, Vass,from

9-5. For more info go to MidnightBeeSupply.com

March: high temp average 64 degrees, low temp average 39 degrees

Nancy’s Calendar

Swarming has already begun. Now is the time to implement swarm prevention techniques. Check for pests and diseases. Complete pest and disease treatments by early April to protect honey from contamination.

Small Hive Beetle prevention: The Freeman Beetle trap, beetle jails.

Varroa Mite treatment: Mite Away Quick Strips are the only treatment that can be used during the honey flow.

If honey stores are low, feed with sugar syrup of 1:1ratio or thinner.

Add additional honey supers now;continue to add as needed. Remove entrance reducers. Equalize hives to strengthen weak hives. Rearrange hive bodies to give the queen more room to lay. Remember bees move up to take advantage of usable space, not down. Replace old, undesirable comb.

Swarm prevention methods:Hive splits, removal of queen cells,checker-boarding of frames, removal/replacement of queen,baiting empty hives for swarm retrieval.

Queen assessment:Brood laying pattern,attitude, age, level of production. Additionally, queens can have the VSH (Varroa Sensitive Hygiene) quality. VSH colonies remove mites from one another.

A break in production through replacement of the queen can clear up diseases,and potentially keep a hive from swarming. This is done by removing the current queen and replacing her by one of several methods: Requeening w/ a mated queen-high level of acceptance;requeening w/a virgin queen-50-60% acceptance; using a queen cell-40 day delay in egg laying. A “walkaway queen” is produced with brood frames, workers, honey and pollen,placing them “15 feet or 3 miles” from the hive qf origin.

Spring Info

The honey-making process involves bees being attracted to nectar in flowers, gathering the nectar,and the removal of water and addition of enzymes (supplied by the bees) to produce 0 honey. Labeling directions for honey are on the NCSBA website. How to register.}o ( certified honey is at the site ReaiNChoney.com.

NCSBA has sample questions at the association website to prepare for testing in Certified, Journeyman, and Master Beekeeper categories.

Business Meeting

The business portion of the meeting opened at 8:09. The invocation was delivered by

Chaplain Bailey. The minutes from January were approved by a show of hands.

The treasury balance was $3556.59,and the report was accepted by a show of hands. On April 14th (Good Friday) Epicenter Church will host Hop in the Park. A proposal to present the Headquarter’s Library with a beekeeping magazine was passed by a

show of hands.

President Jones suggested to members the book Honeybee Diseases and Pests as an invaluable resource.

The meeting was adjourned at 8:28.

2016

December 2016 - No Meeting

November 29th, 2016 - Meeting Minutes

The annual dinner meeting began at 6:45 with the pre-business portion. Memberships and how the gift baskets and bee equipment would be awarded were determined. An opening prayer was led by Chaplain Kenny Bailey, followed by a holiday poem from Jim Fleming.

Dinner and membership sign-ups followed.

Nancy Ruppert provided the December year-end review and hive assessment:

As much as possible, leave the hives alone. Take a break. Combine weak hives and those with failing queens. If there is less than a super of honey, feed 2:1 syrup. Small hives may be insulated.

Kenny Jones showed slides reviewing 2016.

In January, a new law regarding the use of antibiotics goes into effect. The change can affect beekeepers.

Upcoming Events and Dates FSU Exposition 2/11/17 North and South Carolina Spring Beekeepers Meeting 3/3-4/17

Cape Fear Wildlife Expo 3/17-19/17

Earth Day 4/22/17

Dogwood Festival date? $100 and $300 entry fees.

Kenny Jones and Kenny Bailey are going to lead a certification program for beekeepers. Dates and more information will follow.

Business Meeting Meeting began at 7:50. Minutes from October were distributed.

The treasury report was submitted. The ending balance was $3817.92.

Gift baskets and bee equipment were awarded by drawing tickets. Tickets were given for 2016 and 2017 paid memberships to CCBA.

The meeting adjourned at 8:23.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING CUMBERLAND COUNTY BEEKEEPERS ASSOCIATION Tuesday, January 1Oth, 2017 Members present: Kenny Jones, President; Bob Wholey, Vice-president; Connie Blacketer, Secretary; John Horvath, Treasurer; Paul Johnson, 1st year board member; Jim Fleming, 2nd year board member; Kenny Bailey, Chaplain.

Items Discussed

January meeting: Finalize schedule of presentations, speakers, and events for 2017. Bee sources for new members. Recipes: pollenpatties, fondant, Honey Bee Healthy to be available to members.

Membership, both at the local and state levels, are of continued importance. Positive benefits of state membership wre covered, and board members are required to be state members.

Lifespan of a beekeeper: 2 years. By the 3rd/4th year only 15% remain!

Name tags instead of membership cards have been suggested, as well as monthly meeting attendance door prizes.

The CCBA logo was selected.

There will be a need for honey donations for events in 2017, including the county and state fairs, the expo at FSU, and others.

CCBA still needs a permanent .storage facility for our equipment.

October 25, 2016 - Meeting Minutes

Happy Holidays,·beekeepers! The October pre-business meeting opened at 7:04. President Kenny Jones had a video about Fall management from the University of Georgia, which has a series of good videos available. There was so much information in this video that only the topics are listed here, as it would take too much space to give more details.

Fall Management topics: WinterizeFall is the 2nd harvest seasonStarvation risk highest in / late winter/early springWinter concerns–Adequate foodWinter feeding 2:1syruplnternal division board feedersVentilationReduce entranceFace hives S/SE Shield hives from windUse warm days to check hives Don’t open hives if under 45 degreesEach hive needs a minimum of 60 stored pounds of honey (in the South) for winter food suppliesTracheal treatments–60-79 degrees, place in top super if there is no marketable honey;over 79 degrees,place in bottom super

One Year in the Life of an Apiary: Winter concerns: A healthy queen Medication FeedingTreatmentsVentilationEntrance reduction Spring concerns: A healthy queen MedicationFeedingTreatmentsSwarm prevention

Equalization of colonies

Recommended book: William Longgood”s The Queen Must Die._

November: Temperature averages 40-65 degrees. The first freeze is usually around 10/31 (Halloween). Precipation is approximately 3”.

November chores: Combine weak hives with stronger ones. Ventilate. Weight tops of hives. Add bottom boards. Use entrance reducers. Look for wing problems, which can indicate parasites and diseases.

CCBA potluck dinner will be on November 29th at 6 p.m. There will be 2 baskets for raffle drawings. Edith Griffith, Nancy Ruppert,and Denise Hagemeier will be personally invited to join us for this special evening together.

December 12th will be elections and a short business meeting. There will be no other meeting in December.

Precipitation in one month in Fayetteville, NC! 9/28-29: 7.19” 10/8-9: 10.85” Order Sprng bees now. There is likely to be shortages and higher prices. Business Meeting Called to order at 8:04. The treasury balance is 4504.11, which was accepted by hand vote.

The potluck dinner was discussed,and the club will buy a ham, a turkey,and the drinks. The members will bring a side dish or dessert.

The 2017 elections were discussed,and Bob Wholey was nominated for vice-president. Gary Gill was nominated for the board.

Kenny Jones is now a Coastal Regional Director ! Congratulations. You make us ALL look good!

NCSBA accepts Bee Buzz submissions from all members,so join up. Meeting was adjourned at 8:18.

September 27th 2016 - Meeting Minutes

President Kenny Jones opened the pre-business meeting at 7:02.

Kenny Jones showed an excellent film on Tracheal mites. Multiple treatments,including solutions without chemicals,were presented.

Temperature lows for October will be around 50 degrees;highs will be in the mid- 70’s. The first freeze could occur around 10/31. Predicted precipitation is 3”,1.1” less than September.

October Beekeeping Chores

Treatments for Varroa mites should be done in Fall and Spring. Treatments for Tracheal mites should be done in Fall and Winter. As with all treatments in your hive,follow directions carefully.

Remove queen excluders,if present.

Combine weak hives, or those with failing queens. Feed 2:1syrup from now until Spring. limit hive inspections after mid-October. Propolis is being produced and used to seal cracks and openings in the hive.

Add entrance reducers to keep mice out of the hive. Drones will be expelled from the hive in October. Plant herbaceous herbs for multiple-season nectar and pollen sources. See NCSU publication “An Herb Garden for the Bees” for outstanding ideas. President Jones vouches for the value ofthis book! Some ofthe annuals and perennials that are beneficial to bees are Cilantro, Chives, Asters,Zinnias,Goldenrod,Bee Balm,Comfrey,Hissop, Fennel,Lavender,Mint,Sage, Fennel,Thistle,Thyme,and Yarrow. Also view sites on the NCSU Agricultural Extension Services for more about beekeeping,plants that are bee-favorable, and other items of interest.

CCBA’s booth took first place at the Cumberland County Fair! Thank you to all whose hard work made that possible. There were live bees present every day of the fair,no small feat as they had to be brought each day and returned safely to their hive each night. Thank you, Kenny!!! Many questions were answered every day by our volunteers,and many,many people were educated to the importance of bees to our planet, to the food chain,to the health of our future! Who can say how many potential beekeepers and bee friends came about from the hard work and dedication of those who were present from the club? 9 volunteers took part,but special recognition should go to those who were present the majority of the hours the

fair took place: Kenny Jones,Tammy Shaw, and Bob Wholey. Not only were they there almost every hour of the fair,but also set the booth up and took it down when it was over. The basket raffle brought $303, and the amount generated from honey straw,honey,and candy sales will be included in the minutes for October. So thanks go out to all who worked to make this event the stellar success that it was.

Bob Wholey continues to volunteer at the Spring Lake Farmer’s Market. Keeping the presence of CCBA in the public eye is valuable beyond measure. Thank you, Bob!

The Heritage Festival at Cape Fear Botanicai.Garden was an opportunity to get a CCBA hive update. There was pollen and propolis present,as well as plenty of dark,gentle bees.

The beekeeping class (classroom portion) begins Thursday,September 29th, with instructor Kenny Bailey.

Master Gardenr applications must be received at the Co-op Extension office by 11/18/16. There is NO grace period,so don’t be late!

Business Meeting Meeting opened at 7:50, with the invocation by Chaplain Bailey. Thursday,Sept. 29th,from 4-5:30,there will be a bee demonstration at the Spring Lake Library. All are welcome.

The minutes from August were accepted by hand vote.

Treasury report: $2762.05 Beginning balance/ 1938.00 Deposit/ 220.94 Expenses/ $4479.11Ending balance. The treasury report was accepted by hand vote. There will be reimbursement of expenses incurred for the CC Fair,approved by majority vote. A budget of $25 was approved by vote for a basket to raise money at the potluck dinner in November.

It was suggested that a nominating committee be implemented to recommend potential officers for 2017. Positions to be elected are president, vice-president,secretary, treasurer, and board members. The election will take place in December.

The meeting adjourned at 8:20

August 30th,2016 Meeting Minutes

The meeting opened around 7:05, with anticipation of a beautiful fall,which begins on September 22nd,and the subsequent temperature highs between 74 and 83. Sounds heavenly!

In planning for fall/winter bee feeding, Aldi’s is the cheapest source for sugar in our area. Other supplements to the bee diet include pollen patties and fondant,which can be made following directions available on the internet.

President Jones presented a video on European and American Foul Brood. Knowledge is our best defense against hive loss!

Brood should ideally be located in the bottom chamber. Rearrange for optimal placement before winter.

Allow Goldenrod and other fall blooms to remain as long as possible, as they are an impotant source of pollen.

Cumberland County Botanical Garden’s hive is busting at the seams! Thanks to all those who tend them so well.

The Cumberland County Fair will take place from 9/9-18. The banner,cards, and name tags are ready. Thank you,Kenny, for your preparation, which is so vitally important. The bees in their observation hive,as well as the other educational and entertaining displays, will make our club stand out. The new 8 X 20 space, multiple tables,and meticulous attention to details will really pay off. The public will be given an opportunity to see bees safely up close, and money will be raised for club projects. All members are encouraged to take part. You can get in free,so come out and support your club!

The September 10th Field Day was cancelled. Our prayers go out to Nancy Ruppert and family,who had a death in the family.

BUGFEST is coming to the Natural Museum of Science in Raleigh on 9/17 from 9am to 7pm. FREE!!!

Spring Lake library is planning a program in conjunction with CCBA. Please volunteer for some of these public programs presented by our club. Although several of our members donate many hours a month to show their dedication,we need to do our part as well (and I am

including myself in this- it is way too easy to let someone else do the work!!!) Let’s be a visable,hands-on presence,and show our appreciation for all their continued hard work and effort.

NC State Fair is 10/13-23.

Continue pest control! Treat for Varroa mites by the end of August- September at thvery latest. Fall is the optimal time to use Oxalic acid, Apigard, and other chemical treatments. Use non-toxic, honey- and comb-friendly treatments in the spring,and keep toxins out of your honey.

Terramycin can be used in hives exposed to American Foul Brood. AFB is a bacterial disease that can infect un-gassed hives for decades. Never risk it!!

Nosema,a disease caused by a Protozoa,causes many problems in the hive. Be watchful for potential threats,and take a strong hive into winter,as it will be much more likely to survive.

Continue feeding! 1:1sugar syrup mixture untilthe end of September,when you should switch to a 2:1ratio. 50-70 pounds of honey (or more,depending on the winter) is needed to winter your bee hive, without supplemental food. Don’t let your bees starve to death!!!

CLUB BUSINESS

The fall beekeeping class (classroom segment), with Master Beekeeper and outstanding teacher Kenny Bailey,will begin Thursday,9/29, and continue for 6 weeks. This is required in order to take the hands-on,field portion of the class which will be given in the spring.

President Kenny Jones again gave out his personal number to be available to all members as needed. 910 988-6330.

The treasury balance was $2762.05. Meeting adjourned??? OOPS!

July 26th, 2016 Meeting Minutes

Prebusiness meeting began at 7:09.

Topics covered:

NCSBA Summer meeting. Entering honey in competitions.

Congrats, Kenny Jones, for your 1st place in the Bread and Butter Pickles category.

WWW.FieldWatch.com registers hives on a site for notification of insecticide applications. Registered hives can be viewed via satellite.

There was $57 in sales at the Spring Lake Farmer’s Market in July. Tony Jenkins brought the observation hive for the public. Many thanks to all who participated!

Sustainable Sandhills had 2 tables at July’s Fourth Friday, and Friday CCBA had the observation hive and other materials there to promote the film “More Than Honey”, which showed Saturday at the Cameo. There was excellent turnout Friday and Saturday by the public and CCBA members, and the observation hive and educational materials were at the Cameo Saturday as well.

The town of Spring Lake is spraying for mosquitos in July and August. Hope Mills may be also, though this was not confirmed.

Mosquito dunks, which are harmless to bees, are available free to the public at the county health department.

There is a pesticide application class August 17th and 18th at the Cumberland County Agriculture building. This is recommended for anyone involved in any aspect of agriculture, especially beekeeping.

Cumberland County Fair is September 9th- 18th. Entries for competitions are due Tuesday, September 6th 9a.m.-7p.m., and Wednesday, September 7th 9a.m.- 7p.m. There are many categories for honey entries, and the reguirements are in the Fair 2016 brochure.

Saturday, September 10th is the club Field Day with Nancy Ruppert. Sign up for participation.

Swarms are being reported for recovery to CCBA. Kenny Jones and others have been getting the word out, and this prevents the killing of bees, and grows the businesses of club members.

State Fair is October 13th-23rd. State beekeepers made $42,000 in honey at the fair last year!!!

Mentors are needed. Follow up and follow through! Bob helped Tammy when she was getting started; Tammy helped Paul, a new resident, when he needed help. Current mentors are Tammy Shaw, Bob Wholey, Jim Fleming, and John Harris.

Other notes: Apply medication/treatments in September, the earlier the better. When

working hives, always start from the outer frames, which gives greater protection to the queen. Start smokers from the bottom-LOL. Pollen in our area is plentiful year-round, according to John Harris, and pollen patties are a waste of money. It was recommended that cooking spray could be used to prevent bees around hummingbird feeders. THIS IS HARMFUL TO HUMMINGBIRDS, AS OIL ON THEIR FEATHERS CAN HARM THEM! PLEASE DON’T DO THIS!

We saw a great video on preparing honey for shows by Virginia Webb from the Eastern Apiculture website. Very informative.

Harvest remaining honey.

NOTES FROM NANCY RUPPERT Things to do over the next 30 days

Check for and implement preventive measures against Small Hive Beetles, Varroa Mites, Wax moths, Yellow Jackets, and hornets.

Last chance for queen assessment and replacement. Last splits should be done in August.

Water should be available at all times for your bees, as they use a lot in the summer. Use entrance reducers to keep “bad bees” and other invaders out of the hive.

Keep hive inspections brief at this time of the year.

Storing comb possibilities: Freezing; standing vertically open to light (only if empty of pollen and well ventilated ); with PDB crystals.

Put supers out for cotton honey, if near cotton fields.

Business meeting. opened at 8:19. Cumberland County Fair September 9th-18th. September1oth, club Field Day with Nancy Ruppert. September 17th- Spring Lake Farmer’s Market NCSBA asked Kenny Jones to join their certified producers. Any honey produced or promoted by CCBA must be according to all proper guidelines and standards.

Treasury report: $2837.80 beginning balance, $60 deposit, $40.50 expenditures, $2857.30 ending balance.

New business:

County Fair application was submitted, with a request for more space. We have a new banner for events. Name tags are in the works. Business cards that can be used by any members are available.

Can CCBA get a free booth at the upcoming gun show? The meeting adjourned at 8:37.

March 29th, 2016 Meeting Minutes

Pre-business meeting, conducted by Kenny Jones:

First topic,the excellent, eye-catching pictorial article featuring Tony Jenkins and Bob Wholey of the CCBA,featured in the Paraglide. There was a huge amount of information in this article, as well as first-rate,interesting pictures to accompany the story. Superior job, Mindy Love,Tony, and Bob!

The State Parks of NC have provided the public with 100 years of service and entertainment. Let’s take full advantage of the numerous opportunities for free,healthy activities.

Kenny Jones and Bob Wholey will be presenting a bee demonstration at Cameron School in the near future. Anyone who would like to take part in demonstrations are encouraged to participate.

There is a queen-rearing class in Athens,GA,June 3rd, 4th,10th, and 11th.

Hickory, NC will be the site for the Spring Conference of the State Beekeeper’s Association, co-hosted with the South Carolina SBA. This will take place July 7th, 8th, and 9th.

There were 4 sighted bee swarms and one wasp swarm in the last week. On 3/29/16 Kenny Jones captured 2 swarms! It pays to be prepared!

Beekeeping Notes for April

Recommended by members: Promote the formation of immunity-promoting propolis by roughing up the walls of your hives.

During the nectar flow, treatments should not be used in your hives. Remove feeders. Be prepared to switch out honey supers every 7-10 days during the nectar flow. Trim non-flowering weeds which would hinder bees’ flight. Know about swarm-prevention tactics which might apply to your hives, and be prepared to carry them out. Have a queen excluder to keep a newly captured queen contained in her new hive by placing the excluder UNDER the lowest super,preventing her from exiting for a couple of days.

Hopefully this will enable her to settle in,but is only a temporary measure, as the excluder also traps the drones. Remove ASAP.

A good brood pattern is a necessity,and attests to the quality ofthe queen.. Don’t delay replacing a queen if there are few or no eggs and brood, poor brood pattern, or other indicators of a poorly performing queen.

Nucs and packages should be fed upon installation.

Commercial beekeepers do not use queen excluders to keep the queen out of honey supers, and most CCBA members agree they are not necessary.

Scales may prove helpful during honey production season for establishing production quantities.

Become a certified honey producer- it adds value to your honey through quality certification. Recommended books for the beekeeper: See Kenny Jones for more information.

Vascular Flora of the Carolina s- shows native plants by county. Garden Plants for Honey Bees- highlights pollen and nectar sources.

*Apitherapy *

For those like me,who are unfamiliar with this term,it means bee products that have physical healing properties. That includes all bee products, with the possible exception of bees’ wax. Apitherapy products include:

Raw honey, especially honey from your locale. Benefits allergies, wounds,more. Royal jelly. Beauty product ingrediant,promotes youthful appearance when ingested. Bee venom. Bee stings on the spine and other locations on the body are being used to treat Lyme’s Disease, MS,arthritis, and more.

Next months meeting is April 26th.

The business portion of the meeting opened at 7:50. The treasurers report: Beginning balance: $2647.80

Deposit: 40.00

Ending balance; $2687.80

Nancy Rupert has requested our August 27th demonstration be rescheduled for August 13th or September lOth.

The Cumberland County Fair is rapidly approaching,September 9th- 16th. Our booth needs updating,and we need some fresh ideas for making money! Let’s all put our heads together, and also spend some time at our award-winning booth!

Monica Turner has requested bee demonstrations the 3rd Saturday of the month during the summer. Volunteers are needed.

The Murchison Road farmer’s market needs local honey, as Jim Griffith is not able to be there at this time. Also,is anyone currently supplying honey for the downtown farmer’s market? Let’s not miss these money-making and information-sharing opportunities!

Beasley Broadcasting, thanks to Paul Johnson, will very reasonably promote association endeavors. Let’s utilize this opportunity now!!

Comparing pollen and honey samples whenever possible is a tool that will yield valuable information. Where is your “local” honey REALLY from? Almost all store-bought honey is over-filtered and heat processed,leaving little or no pollen present, and destroying many of the benefits of this miraculous product. Inform people to “Buy local. Get your money’s worth”.

A committee for the Cumberland County Fair was requested and passed by vote. With attendence at the fair falling off,we need to inject some enthusiasm and fresh ideas into our booth. Let’s set a goal for fund-raising, and reach out to educate and entertain those who stop and spend time with us.

The meeting adjourned at 8:13.

February 23, 2016 Meeting Minutes

President Kenny Jones opened the pre-business meeting at 7 p.m.

Nancy Rupert, the bee inspector for the region,was attending and was introduced.

Topics covered:

The spring meeting Feb. 25th-27th in New Bern, NC.

Fat Bee Man videos Saturdays at 8 p.m.

April 2nd event at Carver’s Creek Park from 10-3.

Brushy Mountain Bee Farm Field Day June 25th,with many bee experts presenting. ABF memberships are free until 12/31/16.

Honey from the CCBA will now be on sale in the Botanical Garden gift shop.

NCSBA website has sample exam questions for the journeyman and expert Master Beekeeping certifications.

Current blooming plants in the region: Camellias,Winter Honeysuckle,Henbit,red Maple, Dandelions, Daffodils, and Magnolias.

The first day of spring: Sunday,March 20th.

Honey flow will be in full swing by mid-April. Be ready!

There is a free on-line video about insect pollination of cultivated crops from the USDA.

Preparation for swarms:

1st,try to prevent swarms from your hives (prevention). Also,be prepared if you find a swarm (retrieval). To prevent swarming from your hives, monitor for pests, diseases, and overcrowding. Checker-board frames, keeping clusters of brood together, and rearrange boxes to allow more laying room. Check for varroa mites. Treat if needed. Some treatment options are Apiguard, Apistan,and Mite-Away. Also,use traps or beetle jails for small hive beetles. Additionally, a 1:1sugar syrup can be fed for egg-laying and wax production.

Bait empty hives for retrieval with commercial lures, l mon grass, or old comb when the weather is warm (over 45 degrees).

Sugar water with vanilla or lemon grass can be sprayed on bees when retrieving a swarm.

At 8:15, the business meeting was called to order.

Jim Griffith is still in the hospital, and Kenny Bailey led the group in prayer for him and Denise Hagemeier. Let us continue to keep them both in our prayers.

The January minutes were accepted by vote.

The association treasury currently has $2647.80

The Spring Lake flea market is requesting bee demonstrations during the summer on the 3rd Saturday of each month.

The farmer’s market in downtown Fayetteville is open Saturday, and the one on Murchison Road (across from FSU) is open Wednesdays from 10-2.

A committee for public programs was introduced as a motion by Paul Johnson,seconded by Bob Houle. The motion passed by a vote.

On the ballot on March 15th are a local bond issue about our community parks, as well as a state bond referendum which would contribute millions to FTCC and FSU.

There was a vote on providing maintenance funds for the association’s hive at the Botanical —- Garden. Paul Johnson initiated the measure,which passed by hand vote.

Kenny Jones made the motion to adjourn at 8:36,seconded by Paul Johnson.

January 26th, 2016 Minutes of Meeting

New president Kenny Jones opened the pre-business meeting. Vice-president Paul Johnson shared planned events on the 2016 calendar,and it promises to be an excellent year. A PowerPoint introduced the association’s incoming officers, and the CCBA web site and Facebook information. Members are encouraged to post to the association sites,and to help keep them current and informative.

Plans for 2016 include adding an additional demonstration for verroa mites,prevention of them being so important to the health of the hive. In addition,and especially helpful for members who have never split a hive,are the plans to split the hive at the Botanical Garden,and find the ideal location for the resulting hive.

CCBA applications for new and returning members are available. Annual dues are $10. Also, the North Carolina State Beekeepers Association membership is $15 annually, and applications are available for that as well. The Yellow Book,the directory from NCSBA, has the contact information for its members,and a lot of other valuable information as well.

Meetings are the last Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m.

Feeding your hives (recommended every 5 days) is considered very important. Don’t let your hives starve!

So many topics were covered at the January meeting that they will be briefly listed:

• 2/25-2/27 The spring meeting-New Bern,NC.

• 4/2 Carver’s Creek Field Day. There will be an observation hive and other bee related information, with THE bee expert Nancy Rupert present to demonstrate and educate. This is the 100th anniversary celebration, and will be fun and informational for all.

2

• 4/29 School field day. Volunteers welcome.

• 7/? The Highland Boy Scout Troop has requested a demonstration.

• 10/14-10/23 NC State Fair.

Other upcoming events and matters of interest:

Requeening and splits are scheduled for the February meeting.

Cumberland County Fair, where expansion and updating have been suggested to continue CCBA

success. Last year CCBA took the 2nd place ribbon!

Courses through NCSU on beekeeping, beginning and advanced, are $36.72 each. Equipment, at a 10% discount, is available from Jim Griffith’s store inventory. Mentoring,marketing,and merchandise ideas always welcome. Spring Lake Farmer’s Market requesting bee demonstrations the 3rd Saturday of the month from June through September.

If this wasn’t a lot of information,the video: Growing a Greener World: PotentialThreats to Beekeeping was an eyeopener for beekeepers. Thanks to Paul for keeping the group in the loop!

The business portion of the meeting was called to order at 8:37. After the invocation by Chaplain Kenny Bailey, Kim Brown gave the treasurer’s report,with a balance in the treasury of

$2427.80.

Thank you to our outgoing treasurer and other outgoing officers who devoted their time, energy, and expertise to our association.

There were no minutes read from the last meeting on November 18th.

The only matter of business was the concern and continuing prayer requested for our members Denise Hagemeier and Jim Griffith. Get well very soon!

With no further business, President Kenny Jones made the motion to adjourn, seconded by Paul Johnson, and carried with a hand vote.

2015

October 27, 2015

Prior to the business meeting, Charles Bowden from the Department of Agriculture provided information concerning beekeepers potentially qualifying for participation in a program sponsored by the Department of Agriculture to financially support the planting ofbee friendly plants.

President Johnson requested volunteers for the “swarm call list”.

A video was presented regarding Ross Conrad, a natural beekeeper who advocated utilizing confectioners sugar to address varroa mites.

Also, a short video concerning methods for overwintering was viewed.

President Paul Johnson called the business meeting to order at 8:07pm. Chaplain Kenny Bailey provided a prayer invocation.

UNFINISHED BUSINESS

There were no formal minutes presented as Paul Johnson indicated they would be provided later, and President Johnson also provided a summary in the Treasurer’s absence, indicating that there was about $3,000 held by the club in the Treasurer’s absence.

Jake Martin discussed the details concerning the Cumberland County Fair, and the fact that not many people attended the fair this year. He reported that the fair organization was poor and that the attendance was sparse, and that rides were generally not operating. This resulted in very few people visiting the club’s booth. We were awarded a second place ribbon for the booth.

NEW BUSINESS

The upcoming end of year celebrations and elections were discussed, with the Thanksgiving potluck to be held on Tuesday, November 17. Members were encouraged to come and to bring either a side dish or dessert.

The election was scheduled for Tuesday, December 1. Interested members were urged to run for office. It was noted that the next meeting of the new year would be on the 4th Tuesday in January which would provide ample time to plan the new year’s program of events.

Bob Wholey told members that the Carver Street park was anxious for the club to return on their anniversary celebration on April 2 with the bee display. There was discussion about the fact that the park would like to pursue the placement of a permanent hive there.

President Johnson indicated that the Botanical Park hive was doing well.

With no further business, President Johnson solicited a motion to adjourn the meeting which was made by Jake Martin and seconded by Bob Wholey, with a hand vote approving the same at 8:21 pm.

July 28, 2015 - Meeting Minutes

Prior to meeting being called to order, discussion took place about the Club’s hive at the Botanical Garden. President Johnson reported that by paying attention, he was able to determine that the bees needed additional ventilation, since they were clustered around the hive entrance during a warm weather period. He related further that on the 28th of March the hive had been installed, and that on the 28th of May when the hive was checked, the population or’bees had significantly decreased and no queen could be viewed, although successor cells were present. On July 8, Inspector Nancy Ruppert said that a box should be added to the hive. President Johnson added that he had been utilizing a spray of sugar water as opposed to smoke which had worked just as well in handling the bees.

Connie Blacketer reported an infestation of hive moths and asked members advice as to what steps to follow next with her weak hive. Discussions ensued concerning best methods and ventilation, as well as natural methods to deter insect infestation in hives such as planting mint, using white vinegar and cinnamon, and using a freeman style trap with oil or soapy water.

Regarding preparation of hives for fall, Paul Johnson reviewed methods of checking for hive beetles, including the sugar shake test which utilizes a #8 screen which can be obtained at Highland Lumber and a mason jar. Approximately 2 inches or 300 bees should be collected in the jar, which contains a small amount of powdered sugar. After gently shaking the jar to cover the bees, the sugar is sprinkled out onto a surface and the mites can be counted, as they will not stick to the bees due to the powdered sugar application. If mites in a concentration of over 6% are found, it is necessary to treat for mites.

The sticky board method of detecting mites was also discussed. Over a 24 hour period, the board should be sprayed with Pam and left under the screen. If there are 40 or more mites present upon checking, mite treatment should be administered.

Testing for mites should occur between the beginning of August and the beginning of September.

President Paul Johnson called the business meeting to order at 8:05pm. Chaplain Kenny provided a prayer invocation.

UNFINISHED BUSINESS

Kim Brown gave a brief Treasurer’s Report.

Members were reminded that elections for the Club are held in December and that a nominations committee will be convened in the September meeting.

It was discussed that the Cumberland County Fair will be held from September 11 to 20, and that Jake Martin will preside in general over the Club booth, assisted by volunteers from the Club. President Johnson related that volunteer members should check in at the entrance of the fair that is to the right, not the general entrance, and that a list of those assigned will be given to the fair staff. President Johnson stated that the Club should have a good location this year as he filed the application for a location early.

NEW BUSINESS

It was discussed that the Field Day with Inspector Nancy Ruppert is tentatively scheduled for Saturday, August 29 at Carvers Creek State Park in Spring Lake at 9:30am. The Carvers Creek State Park website provides the following directions:

Some GPS units, sma11phones, and web based directions/map services may send you to the incorrect location(s). Access to the park is obtained only at East Manchester Road and Long Valley Road. Once on East Manchester you may see that there aTe two places where Long Valley Road intersects with East Manchester. This is because Long Valley Road is a horseshoe shaped road. You can only enter the park at the Long Valley Road and East Manchester intersection that has a very large bro\vn sign with white lettering that says, “Carvers Creek State Park.” Also, at this location is a turning/exit lane for your safety, a paved entrance way, and a long post and rail fence. Once your turn into the park go 1/2 a mile down the two lane gravel road to the contact station and parking area on your right. See more information at the bottom of this page.

With no further business, President Johnson solicited a motion to adjourn the meeting which was made by Jim Griffith and seconded by John Harris with a hand vote approving the same at 8:08 pm.

May 26,2015- Meeting Minutes

Prior to the business meeting, there was a sharing of information regarding harvesting honey and the tools and methods used.

President Johnson related to members that a new hive had been installed for the Club at the Botanical Garden, and reported that the first honey super had been added and that the hive was strong and doing well.

President Paul Johnson called the business meeting to order at 7:45pm. Chaplain Kenny Bailey provided a prayer invocation.

There was a motion by Jim Griffith that the minutes from the meeting on Tuesday, April 26, 2015 be accepted without reading aloud, which was seconded by John Harris and approved on a hand vote.

Kim Brown delivered the Treasurer’s Report. There was a deposit of $65.00 during the prior month resulting in a closing balance of$2,666.15.

UNFINISHED BUSINESS

In unfinished business, Paul Johnson reminded members of the policy that participants of Kenny Bailey’s class or other interested parties who joined the Club in July would pay a reduced membership fee for the year of$5.00.

Paul Johnson advised that he had not yet contacted Nancy Ruppert regarding conducting a fall field day but that he planned to do so.

NEW BUSINESS

Discussion regarding interest in planning for the Cumberland County Fair in the fall ensued. President Johnson indicated that the Club should get a head start on planning so that we would have a better advantage on booth space selection, etc.

Paul Johnson stated that he felt confident that Jake Martin will plan to oversee the staffing and sales by club members at the Fair, which he has done consistently in the past. President Johnson suggested that the Club could consider selling new merchandise, such as T shirts with a motto such as “God save the Queen” or something of that nature.

Paul Johnson welcomed any members who wish to volunteer to participate in the Fair to let him know at the meeting, or to contact him at 910-978-3930.

President Johnson also told members that a new super would be added to the Club’s hive at the Botanical Garden on Thursday, May 28 a112:30 and invited interested members to attend.

John Rehder advised members that he had interactions with members of the Hoke County and Duplin County Beekeeper Associations, and that they had interest in sharing speakers with our Club. John had provided them with Paul Johnson’s contact information.

A discussion regarding whether any members sold products at the local Farmers Markets ensued. Jim Griffith indicated that he supports and is a member of the Murchison Road Farmers Market which is conducted by the Fayetteville Farmers Markets Association.

Members did not appear to have much information concerning the downtown Farmers Market. Members were urged to let the Club know if they obtained any information concerning this market so that our members could potentially become involved.

With no further business, President Johnson solicited a motion to adjourn the meeting which was made by Jim Griffith and seconded by John Rehder, with a hand vote approving the same at 8:00 pm.

APRIL 28, 2015 - Meeting Minutes

Prior to the official meeting being convened, there was a review and recap about the recent Field Day.

Vice President Gary Gill gave a presentation regarding splitting hives,and the various methodologies and advantages/disadvantages of each method.

President Paul Johnson called the business meeting to order at 8:01pm. Chaplain Kenny Bailey delivered an invocation prayer.

The reading aloud of the minutes from January and March was suspended and a motion to approve acceptance without doing so was made by Kim Brown, seconded and approved on hand vote.

Treasurer Kim Brown delivered the Treasurer’s Report,indicating that the present balance of the CCAB account was $2,601.15, with a deposit of $100 having been made, no withdrawals since the last report. There was no UNFINISHED BUSINESS to review. Under NEW BUSINESS, State Membership cards were distributed for those who had applied for State membership.

Volunteers with the recent Field Day and the Wholeys who volunteered at the Fort Bragg library event were thanked for their help. It was discussed that Nancy Ruppert had offered another Field Day in the fall,and President Johnson agreed to contact her concerning available dates.

Bob and Jim Wholey agreed to keep the club up to date on other opportunities for volunteers at Fort Bragg,as they indicated that they have such events from time to time.

A Motion to Adjourn was made by Ralph Cascasan and seconded by Scott Gibson at 8:40pm,approved on hand votes.

MARCH 31,2015 A discussion took place about the NC/SC State Beekeeper’s Association Conference which was held on February 4, 5, and 6 1 in Monroe.

Members were encouraged to participate in programs such as the library presentation at,Fort Bragg, and it was noted that credit toward accreditation for Beekeeper with the State is available and required for volunteer opportunities such as this.

Kenny Bailey presented a lecture on bee diseases.

It was noted that a membership list will be compiled for the end of April rather than March due to the cancellation of February’s meeting.

President Paul Johnson called the business meeting to order at 8:10pm. Ken Bailey delivered an invocation prayer.

The meeting for February was cancelled due to inclement weather so,the January meeting minutes will be provided at the next meeting in April.

The Treasurer,Kim Brown delivered the Treasurer’s Report. The opening balance on January 2 was $2,358.15. One deposit of $143 was made, there were no withd.,itwals,so the ending balance as of March 31, 2015 was reported as $2,501.15.

There was no unfinished business to review.

Paul Johnson informed the club that Gloria Engvall is establishing a bee cage display at the Botanical Garden. The Wholey brothers reported that our club’s bee cage is repaired.

Jim Griffith announced that he is now an authorized Dadant dealer and will provide our members any Dadant products for a 5% discount off of the catalog price for any items. He also will soon have queens and packages ready.

Under New Business, President Johnson requested a Motion to delay publishing the official roll ofthe membership list until the April meeting due to the cancellation of the February meeting. This motion is required because the by-laws provide that the membership list be posted at the March meeting. John Rehder made a Motion to this effect which was seconded by Lance Andrus and passed on a hand vote.

Paul Johnson informed members that Gary Gill was working on formalizing and revitalizing the Mentor Program, and would be establishing guidelines for this soon.

With no further business, a Motion to Adjourn at 8:25 pm was made by Ralph Cascasan and seconded by Ce Sea Lawson,approved on hand votes.

JANUARY 27, 2015 Meeting Minutes

An informational meeting was held to discuss and explain the various items of beekeeping equipment available for beekeepers, I including hives, feeders, etc.

The business portion of the meeting called to order by president Paul Johnson at 7:58p.m. With a call to order and an invocation from Chaplain Kenny Bailey.

There were no prior minutes to accept. The treasurers report was provided by President Johnson, indicating that the current balance ofthe CCBA account was $2,358.15.

Unfinished Business

There was no unfinished business to discuss. New Business President Johnson reviewed the annual calendar of events that was passed out at this meeting. Nancy Ruppert, the NC Bee Inspector was present and a discussion ensued concerning the upcoming field day scheduled for Aprill8, with a rain date of April25.

Members were reminded that the NC/SC Beekeepers Association would be holding the pring meeting from February 5 to 7 and Inspector Ruppert urged members to attend.

Jim Griffith mentioned that vendors would be present from many bee supply companies selling their wares.

John Harris is selling 5 frame nucs and Jim Griffith is selling_packages of bees for those interested they should be contacted directly.

A motion was made to adopt the Schedule of Meeting Topics which was passed around to Members, by John Rehder, seconded by Ralph Cascasan passed by hand vote, with correction noted that the March meeting will be on March 31, not March 26 as written.

A Motion to Adjourn was made by Jim Griffith, seconded by Ralph Cascasan at 8:10pm.